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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

Click "More / Share / Borrow" for each clip's source context and citation link. HTML5 compatible browser required

Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: The problem that we are confronted with, the challenge that we are facing is not the working level guy, some mustache-twirling villain out to destroy your life. It's the fact that senior officials are investing themselves with powers that they are not entitled to, and they are doing it without asking the public for any kind of consent.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: It's the sort of conspiratorial thinking that can emerge sometimes when we see the government has committed real and serious abuses that lead us to think they can do no good and the government has legitimate programs and purposes and they can do great things. The NSA can as well. I think it's important to remember that people don't set their lives on fire. They don't say good-bye to their families, actually pack up without saying good-bye to their families. They don't walk away from their extraordinarily comfortable lives. I made a lot of money for a guy with no high school diploma, and burn down everything they love for no reason.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: I think no American could be prohibited from coming home or traveling anywhere else without feeling a sense of loss. But, again, I may have lost my ability to travel, but I have gained the ability to go to sleep at night, put my head on the pillow and feel comfortable that I have done the right thing even when it was the hard thing. And I'm comfortable with that.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: The way to think about this is, again, I already know how to deal with counterintelligence. Beyond that, I took nothing to Russia, so could give them nothing. Williams: You say you're not carrying around any of these materials. You’ve handed them off. If I gave you a laptop, could you access the documents? Snowden: No, no. Williams: no, you couldn't remotely, electronically access material? Snowden: No. Williams: It's gone from your control? Snowden: Right. I don't have any control
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: It’s no secret that the U.S. tends to get more and better intelligence out of computers nowadays than they do out of people. I was trained as a spy in sort of the traditional sense of the word. I lived and worked undercover, overseas pretending to work in a job that I'm not and even being assigned a name that was not mine. Now the government might deny these things, frame it in certain ways and say, oh, he's a low level analyst but what they are trying to do is they are trying to use one position that I have had in a career here or there to distract from the totality of my experience.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: I’ve worked for the central intelligence agency undercover overseas. I’ve worked for the national security agency undercover overseas. And I worked for the defense intelligence agency as a lecturer at the joint counter-intelligence training academy where I developed sources and methods for keeping our information and people secure in the most hostile and dangerous environments around the world. So when they say I'm a low level systems administrator that I don't know what I'm talking about I'd say it's somewhat misleading.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: I’ve never told anybody this, no journalist. But I was on Ft. Meade on September 11th. I was right outside the NSA, so I remember, I remember the tension of that day. I remember hearing on the radio the planes hitting. And I remember thinking my grandfather who worked for the FBI at the time was in the pentagon when the plane hit it. I take the threat of terrorism seriously, and I think we all do.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: And I think it's really disingenuous for the government to invoke and sort of scandalize our memories. To sort of exploit the national trauma that we all suffered together and worked so hard to come through to justify programs that had never been shown to keep us safe but cost us liberties and freedoms that we don't need to give up, and our constitution says we should not give up.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Williams: Why not cast the widest net possible? Innocent people around the country were -- all felt the same way. I've got nothing to hide. We've got to find this enemy we can't see. Snowden: The definition of a security state is any nation that prioritizes security over all other considerations. I don't believe the United States is or ever should be a security state. If want to be free we can't become subject to surveillance. We can't give away our privacy. We can't give away our rights. We have to be an active party. We have to be an active part of our government. And we have to say there are some things worth dying for. I think the country is one of them.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: In 2004, I joined the U.S. army under the 18 x-ray special forces recruit program. Now, I have to give high respect to everyone in the military and especially the graduates of those programs because they are better men than I. I was injured very early on in the program and washed out. You know, I readily admit it, I don't hide that. Williams: Snowden reportedly left the military after breaking both of his legs in training. Snowden: But the fact is that I tried. You know, I saw what was going on in the world. I believed the government's arguments that we were going to do good things in Iraq, that we were going to free the oppressed. And I wanted to do my part to help share the national burden and create not just a better America but a better world.
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